Practice Tips

3  SECRETS OF MUSIC LESSON PRACTICE… REVEALED

Music lessons are unique from almost any other after school activity because practice sessions happen without an instructor or teacher.  Soccer, baseball, dance, and even art classes include practice time as part of the program.  The nature of these activities makes participating in practice sessions straightforward. 

When it comes to music lessons, there are no set practice times; it is up to you and your children to establish these routines. While this requires a little extra effort up front, teaching your children the skills they need to structure and engage in independent study will result in a wealth of benefits that extend beyond the instrument and into many areas of their lives.

Below you’ll find three strategies for helping your children become independent and effective in their home practice.

Three  Strategies For Effective Practice

1) Regular Routines

Short, focused, and regular visits to the instrument help your children retain and understand what they are learning, while making the most of their short attention spans.

Setting a regular time of day when practice happens “no matter what” will ensure daily practice routines are easy for your children to maintain.  Much like you would do for school homework.  If you make practicing as important as homework and tie them together, your chance of success dramatically increases.

For busy families, establishing a morning practice routine is very helpful.  Friendly Practice Environments Placing your piano in an easy-to-access location increases the likelihood that your children will practice more frequently as they go about their days. 

2) Friendly Practice Environments

Having an easy-to-access location increases the likelihood that your children will practice more frequently as they go about their days.  Music lessons are unique from almost any other after school activity because piano practice sessions happen without an instructor or teacher. Soccer, baseball, dance, and even art classes include practice time as part of the program. The nature of these activities makes participating in practice sessions straightforward.

When it comes to music lessons, there are no set practice times; it is up to you and your children to establish these routines. While this requires a little extra effort up front, teaching your children the skills they need to structure and engage in independent study will result in a wealth of benefits that extend beyond the piano and into many areas of their lives.  Find a balance between shoving the piano in the basement vs. putting the piano in the center of your most-used room.  Practice space should be located in a comfortable area, close to where the family is, but away from major distractions. 

3) Practice Helpers

Up until the age of 11, your children will need hands-on help with home practice. And even though you may not read music or play the piano, your assistance is still very much needed! Parental help can take the form of reading lesson notes, organizing practice time, providing encouragement through difficult sections or situations, and seeking out answers for “I’m stuck on this” problems. Your help at home will make a substantial difference in your children’s progress.

For more practice tips, please check out this article from Dorthea Herrmann; https://www.flowkey.com/en/how-motivate-child-practice-piano

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